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PRACTICAL VEDANTAM-1.4

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14/03/2018

PRACTICAL VEDANTAM-1.4
PART - I.4

(Delivered in London, 10th November 1896)


Everything goes to show that this philosophy must be very practical; and later on, when we come to the Bhagavad-Gita — most of you, perhaps, have read it, it is the best commentary we have on the Vedanta philosophy — curiously enough the scene is laid on the battlefield, where Krishna teaches this philosophy to Arjuna; and the doctrine which stands out luminously in every page of the Gita is intense activity, but in the midst of it, eternal calmness.

This is the secret of work, to attain which is the goal of the Vedanta. Inactivity, as we understand it in the sense of passivity, certainly cannot be the goal. Were it so, then the walls around us would be the most intelligent; they are inactive. Clods of earth, stumps of trees, would be the greatest sages in the world; they are inactive.

Nor does inactivity become activity when it is combined with passion. Real activity, which is the goal of Vedanta,…

PRACTICAL VEDANTAM-1.3

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14/03/2018

PRACTICAL VEDANTAM-1.3
PART - I.3

(Delivered in London, 10th November 1896)


Shvetaketu was the son of Âruni, a sage, most probably a recluse. He was brought up in the forest, but he went to the city of the Panchâlas and appeared at the court of the king, Pravâhana Jaivali.

The king asked him, "Do you know how beings depart hence at death?"
"No, sir."
"Do you know how they return hither?"
"No, sir."
"Do you know the way of the fathers and the way of the gods?"
"No, sir."

Then the king asked other questions. Shvetaketu could not answer them.

So the king told him that he knew nothing.

The boy went back to his father, and the father admitted that he himself could not answer these questions.

It was not that he was unwilling to answer these questions. It was not that he was unwilling to teach the boy, but he did not know these things.

So he went to the king and asked to be taught these secrets. The king said that these …

PRACTICAL VEDANTAM-1.2

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09/03/2018

PRACTICAL VEDANTAM-1.2
PART I.2

(Delivered in London, 10th November 1896)


Shvetaketu was the son of Âruni, a sage, most probably a recluse. He was brought up in the forest, but he went to the city of the Panchâlas and appeared at the court of the king, Pravâhana Jaivali.

The king asked him, "Do you know how beings depart hence at death?" "No, sir." "Do you know how they return hither?" "No, sir." "Do you know the way of the fathers and the way of the gods?" "No, sir."

Then the king asked other questions. Shvetaketu could not answer them. So the king told him that he knew nothing.

The boy went back to his father, and the father admitted that he himself could not answer these questions.

It was not that he was unwilling to answer these questions. It was not that he was unwilling to teach the boy, but he did not know these things.

So he went to the king and asked to be taught these secrets. The king said that these th…